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City info

The beautiful city of Verona with its red-tiled rooftops and leafy trees overlooking the Adige River is not surprisingly a popular tourist attraction. Although it still has some interesting Roman monuments, such as the impressive 2000-year-old amphitheatre  and the Porta Borsari gateway, the destructive earthquake in 1117 destroyed the rest. Rebuilt in Romanesque style there are plenty more ancient buildings to visit including Juliet’s house and balcony, immortalized forever in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

Getting Around Verona

Verona has no train service or metro but most of the attractions are within easy walking distance of the amphitheatre and Piazza Bra. Buses 11, 12 or 13 will take you from the train station (Stazione Porta Nuova) and adjoining bus station to the Arena (Piazza Bra) and from there everywhere is accessible on foot.

Verona Attractions

Verona Arena (Arena di Verona)

Completed in 30AD, this enormous Roman amphitheatre was built to watch spectacles such as exciting chariot races and gladiators fighting lions and wild animals (and each other) to the death. The crumbling exterior of this third largest amphitheatre in the world adds to the atmosphere and awe. It is still a fully functioning entertainment venue, but for less bloodthirsty events such as opera, fairs and pop concerts! Checkout the programme and see who’s playing during your visit.

Location: Via Roma 7/d, 37121

Getting there by car: From Highway A4 or A22, take the exit for Verona Sud. Follow the signs “tutte le direzioni” (all directions), and then Verona city centre. It is recommended that you pre-book your car-parking space in advance at Arena Parking on Via M. Bentegodi 8, Verona 37122

Getting there by bus: The 11, 12 or 13 bus will take you from the train station (Stazione Porta Nuova) and adjoining bus station to the Arena (Piazza Bra).

Getting there on foot: From the bus station it is a rather busy and unpleasant walk to the town centre and Piazza Bra. From the front of the railway station head to the right. Cross the road and continue to the right until you reach the Porto Nuova stone gateway. Turn left up Corso Porto Nuova Boulevard and walk as far as the arched gateway in the city wall. Just beyond the gateway is Piazza Bra and the town centre.

Juliet’s House (Casa de Giulietta)

This 13th century former inn is a well-visited tourist attraction, said to be the location of the balcony featured in Shakespeare’s tragic love story Romeo and Juliet. Of course, it has no connection with Shakespeare’s fictitious family but it is a popular romantic shrine for couples having their photographs taken beneath the iconic balcony! The 13th century house is open for visitors and has some Renaissance frescoes and the bed used in the filming of Zeffirelli’s movie.

Location: Just off Piazza delle Erbe at 27 Via Capello

Getting there on foot:From the amphitheatre and Piazza Brawalk northeaston Via Anfiteatro. Turn left on Via Scala and right in Corso Porto Borsari to reach Piazza delle Erbe in about 10 minutes.

Getting there by bus: Buses 11, 12 and 13 all run to the piazza from the bus and train stations

Piazza Delle Erbe (Herb Market)

This square was once the home of the Roman Forum and still remains the focal point of the city. It now has a collection of attractions including the Fontana di Madonna Verona Fountain. This features a female statue dating back to Roman times, holding a scroll with the crest of the city of Verona on it. From the base of the statue the water flows through eight masks. Also in the square are the old Town Hall, the Lamberti Tower, Gardello Tower, the Palazzo Maffei and a tourist market. This is a great place to find local cafés where you can enjoying eating outdoors while savouring the atmosphere of this bustling Roman Court. Note the wall frescoes still in evidence on the old walls above the café umbrellas.

Location: Piazza delle Erbe

Getting there on foot: From the amphitheatre and Piazza Brawalk northeaston Via Anfiteatro. Turn left on Via Scala and right in Corso Porto Borsari to reach Piazza delle Erbe in about 10 minutes.

Getting there by bus: Buses 11, 12 and 13 all run to the piazza from the bus and train stations

Lamberti Tower (Torre dei Lamberti)

Built in 1463 this is Verona’s tallest tower at 84 metres (275 feet) and is easy to identify with its clock tower looking down on the Piazza delle Erbe. Access to the tower is through the palace courtyard. The tower makes an excellent place to enjoy breathtaking views over the city for those willing to climb the 238 steep steps to the top. However, there is also lift and from the top you can see as far as the Alps on a clear day.

Location: Piazza delle Erbe

Getting there on foot: From the amphitheatre and Piazza Brawalk northeaston Via Anfiteatro. Turn left on Via Scala and right in Corso Porto Borsari to reach Piazza delle Erbe in about 10 minutes.

Getting there by bus: Buses 11, 12 and 13 all run to the piazza from the bus and train stations

Palazzo Maffei

Decorated with many statues of Greek gods, this baroque palace was completed in 1668. Note the column in front of it supporting the Venetian lion to mark Verona becoming part of the Venetian Empire in 1405.

Location: North end of Piazza delle Erbe

Getting there on foot:From the amphitheatre and Piazza Brawalk northeaston Via Anfiteatro. Turn left on Via Scala and right in Corso Porto Borsari to reach Piazza delle Erbe in about 10 minutes.

Getting there by bus: Buses 11, 12 and 13 all run to the piazza from the bus and train stations

Verona Cathedral (Duomo)

Like many of Verona’s historic buildings, the original 8th century cathedral was lost during the earthquake of 1117. This replacement with its Romanesque façade was completed in 1187. Look for the pillars supported by two griffins and admire the swordbearing knights of Oliver and Roland carved by Nicolo on the façade. Near the side door is the carved story of Jonah and the Whale. Inside the cathedral there are some impressive artworks including an original of the Assumption by Titian in one of the side chapels.

The Romanesque cloister along one side of the Duomo shows clear evidence of earlier excavated ruins. The adjoining baptistery building has a beautiful marble font and more mediaeval artworks.

Location: Piazza Duomo

Getting there on foot: The cathedral is a 15 minute walk from the amphitheatre. Head to the river along Via Guglielmo Oberdan and Via Armando Diaz. Turn right at the riverfront and walk along Lungoadige Panvinio to reach the cathedral.

Castelvecchio

This 14th century red brick castle stands on the banks of the river and houses the Verona Art Museum, one of the finest outside Venice. It is packed with Renaissance era artworks, silverware, painted glass and sculptures. The castle itself is a great place to visit with its extensive ramparts which can be explored.

Located beside the River Aldige, you can walk across the adjoining Ponte Scaligero Bridge which links the castle with the Arsenal and get some great photographs of this fortified castle. It was rebuilt after being blown up during World War II and in a remarkable act of restoration, the river was dredged to recover much of the original masonry.

Location: Corso Castelvecchio 2

Getting there of foot: From the amphitheatre, join Via Dietri Anfiteatro and walk a short distance to the left. Turn right on Vicoletto Listone, left on Via Carlo Cattaneo, right on Via Brusco and left on Corso Cavour which becomes Corso Castelvecchio.

Basilica de St Zeno (San Zeno Maggiore)

Built between 1120 and 1138, this Romanesque basilica was built to house the remains of Verona’s patron saint whose remains lie in the crypt. The façade includes a beautiful 12th century rose window and marble relief work. The main attraction however is the magnificent bronze doors with 48 panels depicting bibles scenes and the life of St Zeno. The altarpiece by Mantegna of the Virgin and Child dates back to 1457.

Location: Piazza di San Zeno 2

Getting there on foot: The basilica is a 10-15 minute walk along the river on Regaste San Zeno from Castelvecchio, but it is well worth the effort.

Giardino Giusti

Once one of Italy’s finest Renaissance gardens, the tranquil Giardino Giusti was laid out in 1580. With formal trimmed box hedges and classical statues it makes an elegant contrast of natural and manmade delights and offers a quiet space beyond the city bustle. A short climb provides wonderful city views.

Location:  Via Giardino Giusti 2

Getting there on foot: It takes about 17 minutes to walk to the Giardino Giusti from the amphitheatre along Via Stella, over the Ponte Nuovo Bridge. Turn left along Interrato Acqua Morta and right on Via Porta Organa

 

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