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The Czech Republic has emerged from its former Communist rule to become one of Europe’s hottest destinations. The capital, Prague, has something for everyone, from cobblestone streets and a massive castle complex to museums, shopping, trendy cafés, local breweries and a happening nightlife.

Getting Around Prague
Prague’s historic district is fairly easy to get around on foot, but to get from one district to another there are three Metro lines connecting the Old Town, New Town and Lower Town. Tickets can be purchased from ticket machines, convenience stores and railways stations and can also be used on buses, the Metro and regional S-trains. A multi-use Transport Pass (which is different from a Prague Pass) can be purchased for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days unlimited travel on buses, trams, Metro and funicular railways.

Prague Attractions

Prague Castle District (Hradcany)
The Castle District is on an elevated site overlooking the rest of Prague city centre. It includes St Vitus Cathedral, churches and museums set around three courtyards with gardens, castle fortifications and the state apartments. The Castle was built in the 9th century and is still the official residence of the President. The Changing of the Guards ceremony takes place every hour with a special noon ceremony including a fanfare and flag ceremony. Tickets include admission to all the different sights within the castle complex. The Old Royal Palace was where the kings of Bohemia lived in style from the 11th to 17th centuries. The Royal Apartments can be toured, along with Vladislav Hall where kings were crowned and knights once jousted as entertainment. The complex also includes the Basilica of St George and the Benedictine Convent which now houses the National Gallery artworks. Walk along the cobbled alley behind the convent to find Golden Lane, a charming row of 16th century tradesmen’s cottages built into the castle foundations.
Location: West of Charles Bridge in the Hradcany area.
Getting there by Metro: The nearest Metro station is Hradcany
Getting there by Tram: Trams 22, 23 or X-A all stop at Prazsky Hrad.

St Vitus Cathedral
St Vitus Cathedral is within the Castle complex and is the largest church in the Czech Republic. Built in French Gothic style, its elegant spires soar high above the ramparts. The famous Golden Gate has coloured mosaic scenes of the Last Judgement above the arched south entrance and was created in 1370. Inside the cathedral you will find many ecclesiastical treasures, artworks, side chapels with decorative altars, frescoes, tombs and beautiful stained glass windows. It is the perfect place to visit on a chilly day! Entrance is free, but you need to buy a ticket to tour the crypt, tower and High Altar. Look for the ornate Chapel of St Wenceslas, a 9th century Prague citizen who is immortalised for his good deeds in the Christmas Carol, Good King Wenceslas. Take a look at the Bohemian Crown Jewels in the Coronation Chamber and visit the crypt where most of Prague’s royalty is buried. For great city views (and a keep fit session!) climb the 287 steps to the top of the tower for magnificent city views. Location: Prague Castle complex, Hradcany
Getting there by Tram: Take Tram 22 or 23 to Prazsky Hrad
Getting there by Metro: The nearest Metro station is Malostranska and you can walk through Furstenberk Garden to reach the cathedral.

Franz Kafka Museum
Prague most famous author, Franz Kafka was born in this house in the Malostranska district in 1883. It is now an interesting museum of his life, manuscripts and diaries with 3D and audio visual presentations.
Location: Hergetova Cihelna, Praha 1.
Getting there by Metro: Take the Metro to Malostranska on the west side.
Getting there by Tram: Trams 17, 18, 51 and 54 all have stops at or near the Franz Kafka Museum. The nearest stops are Malostranska on the west side or Staromestska on the east side of the river.

Charles Bridge (Karluv Most)
This old pedestrian bridge across the Vltava River is one of Prague’s most photographed landmarks. It was built in 1357 and was the only means of crossing the wide Vltava River until 1841. It is decorated with the statues of 30 saints, erected over a period of time around the late 17th century and they display a variety of artistic styles.
Location: 2 km east from Prague’s historic Hradcany centre
Getting there by Metro: Take the Metro to Staromestska on the east side of the river, or to Malostranska on the west side.
Getting there by Tram: Trams 17, 18, 51 and 54 all have stops at or near Charles Bridge. The nearest stops are Malostranska on the west side or Staromestska on the east side of the river.

Old Town Square
The lovely Old Town Square has been the heart of the city of Prague since the 11th century. This pretty square is surrounded by historic facades of lovely buildings including local attractions, the Town Hall and two churches. The cobbled surface still hosts markets regularly, the most famous being the Christmas Market in December. Look for the Art Nouveau monument to Jan Hus, a religious reformer and national hero, and the beautiful 600-year-old Astronomical Clock. Take a guided tour of the Town Hall and climb the tower for great city views. The square is home to two famous churches: the domed St Nicholas with its baroque architecture, and the Gothic Tyn Church whose twin towers are an iconic landmark of the city.
Location: Stare Mesto, East Prague
Getting there by Metro: The nearest Metro station is Staromestka just a short walk away along Kaprova
Getting there by Tram: The nearest Tram station is Staromestka and you can make the short walk eastwards along Kaprova to the square.

Astronomical Clock
This ornate Gothic Astronomical Clock is a major attraction for visitors to Prague. Installed in 1410, it is one of the oldest in the world. The astronomical dial represents the position of the sun and the moon with the signs of the zodiac on a black dial. The calendar dial with medallions showing seasonal activities represents the months. Each hour the mechanical figures representing Vanity (with a mirror), Miserliness (with a bag of gold), a Turk representing pleasure and entertainment and a skeleton representing Death make a short performance. As part of the hourly dance, the skeleton strikes the hour. Statues of the Apostles appear in doorways above the clock in what is known as the Walk of the Apostles. You can climb up the tower to see the inner workings of the clock as well as getting some great views across the city.
Location: Stare Mesto, Old Town Square
Getting there by Metro: The nearest Metro station is Staromestka, just a short walk away along Kaprova
Getting there by Tram: The nearest Tram station is Staromestka and you can make the short walk eastwards along Kaprova to the square.

Vysehrad
The hill fort district of Vysehrad is an interesting and historic part of Prague and stands on the eastern banks of the Vltava River. The area was probably the first inhabited area of Prague and includes Tabor Gate, Leopold Gate and Brick Gate. There is an early Romanesque Basilica of St Lawrence on even older foundations circa 1070. Other highlights are the remains of a Romanesque Bridge, the Pantheon, various statues and a mediaeval covered well. A walk around this area will take you past the Cinderella House Bilianove, the 11th century St Martin Rotunda, several small churches and chapels and the national Vysehrad Cemetery.
Location: 2.4 km south of Old Town Square in the southeast of the city.
Getting there by Metro: Take the C line to Vysehrad
Getting there by Tram: Trams 7, 8 and 24 all stop at Albertov, or take 3, 7, 16 and 17 to Vyton

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